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Comments ( 8 )

  • Laura M Smith

    The leaves look just like my blue hydrangea leaves and I was wondering which has sprouted elsewhere so I should pull it up and look at the root for orange to be sure and replant if it is a hydrangea with no orange??

    • rgnursery

      That sounds right. Scrape the stem with your fingernail or a thin blade and see if there is a tangerine orange hue to the skin or flesh. If so – that’s bittersweet. Try to yank the whole thing out, by the root, as deeply as possible.

  • Katy Cain

    Hi there,

    I’m putting together an invasive plant fact sheet and this is the best Oriental Bittersweet photo I could find! Could we use it on our document? It’s to help volunteers ID the plant.

    • rgnursery

      Hi Katy! Absolutely – go for it. Thank you for asking us – that’s a nice courtesy and we appreciate it!

  • Priscilla Osgood

    Pulling and cutting in the spring/summer does not get rid of bittersweet in my garden. It seems the more I pull the more grows back. It has twisted into my bushes and small trees. How do I get rid of it?

    • rgnursery

      The best way to combat it: just keep battling it back with brute force. Chop it at the base as often as you can, rip out the suckers and rope-like vines running underground as best you can. Get as much of the root as you can (the roots are orange, so you can spot them that way). You can chop it at the base, and spray the base with an herbicide (some use the heavy duty Round Up spray) but we don’t recommend that because it doesn’t really work that well, and then you’re spraying toxic chemicals all over the place. Just keep yanking it out, and you’ll eventually only have to battle back smaller roots. And the less it produces berries and seeds – the better. If you can rip it out before the berries – you’re doing great.

  • Claudine

    so we just brought quite a bit to our landfill with other yard / brush waste; did we break the law? once you pull it up, how do you get rid of it? we have SO much!

    • rgnursery

      No – I think the local dumps and EPAs know that people are doing the best they can with it. So you will not get in trouble. I think they just don’t want people making wreaths and bouquets and gifts of it in stores or as hobbies, and then sending it around to other states. Or planting it in their garden, not realizing what they’re doing. But if you’re simply trying to manage your yard – I don’t think they consider that criminal. Do not put it in your compost pile, and you may even want to make a pile of it and burn it once a year. The best way to combat it: just keep battling it back with brute force. Chop it at the base as often as you can, rip out the suckers and rope-like vines running underground as best you can. Get as much of the root as you can (the roots are orange, so you can spot them that way). You can chop it at the base, and spray the base with an herbicide (some use the heavy duty chemical spray) but we don’t recommend that because it doesn’t really work that well, and then you’re spraying unnatural chemicals all over the place. Just keep yanking it out, and you’ll eventually only have to battle back smaller roots. And the less it produces berries and seeds – the better. If you can rip it out before the berries – you’re doing great.

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